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SEO For founders - Full Course

Sizing the SEO opportunity

Sizing the SEO opportunity

Sizing the SEO opportunity

Hi there, it's Olli ✌️ I'm Indie Hacker & Co-Founder at getspexia.com

I know that Founders struggle with SEO (I've been there). This is my take to make SEO more accessible & fun to learn. Because it is fun. I am continuously improving the content & hope you will find this valuable. Let me know on X if you spot any mistakes. Enjoy & keep rocking! 🤘

We’ve seen in the previous chapter how I would approach SEO if I had to start from 0 again.

The SEO growth plan.

This chapter is about figuring out the SEO opportunity.

Quantifying it.

How much traffic is reasonable to expect in 3 years.

How much revenue would that bring?

This knowledge allows us to decide if SEO even makes sense or not?

I hope you enjoy this!

We’ve seen in the previous chapter how I would approach SEO if I had to start from 0 again.

The SEO growth plan.

This chapter is about figuring out the SEO opportunity.

Quantifying it.

How much traffic is reasonable to expect in 3 years.

How much revenue would that bring?

This knowledge allows us to decide if SEO even makes sense or not?

I hope you enjoy this!

We’ve seen in the previous chapter how I would approach SEO if I had to start from 0 again.

The SEO growth plan.

This chapter is about figuring out the SEO opportunity.

Quantifying it.

How much traffic is reasonable to expect in 3 years.

How much revenue would that bring?

This knowledge allows us to decide if SEO even makes sense or not?

I hope you enjoy this!

Top down vs. bottom up approach

There are two popular ways of forecasting the traffic potential.

Either you go bottom or top down.

Bottom up is to start from the keywords and topics.

The idea is to find all the topics your target persona could potentially search for.

Estimate where you could rank for this topic if you would write content.

And then predict the traffic based on the ranking.

“The issue with that is that we don’t know the position or the click-through rate by position”, says Ethan Smith.

What he means is that we don’t know the position our article will rank on Google before actually writing and publishing it.

And even if we knew the position exactly (not possible), we would still need to estimate the traffic we get depending on the page position.

This is called click-through rate (CTR).

In other words, when a keyword gets 100 monthly searches and we rank in position 1, how many clicks do we get?

How does it change when we only rank in position 2?

Nobody knows.

We can only estimate this.

But the problem is that using this approach accumulates a lot of estimates.

For each topics we need to estimate the position and the traffic.

This results in very high uncertainty, a big error bandwidth & thus wrong revenue predictions.

Obviously this is bad.

So is there a better option?

Yes there is: Introducing the top down approach.

The top down approach is competitor centric.

We estimate our traffic potential by looking at the organic traffic competitors get.

So, the traffic they get organically through Google.

But do you remember something?

There are two different types of organic traffic: branded and non branded!

We only care about the non branded traffic.

Why?

The branded traffic is people directly looking for your competitors brand.

This is traffic we can’t get.

SEO generally won’t make people magically search for your brand instead of theirs.

So it does not make sense to include competitors branded search volume when trying to estimate the traffic potential for our site.

Great, so we will first gather the non branded search volume of all competitors, and then?

Then we'll fuse them into a traffic and revenue estimate.

Pretty nice!

So let’s get into it, shall we?

There are two popular ways of forecasting the traffic potential.

Either you go bottom or top down.

Bottom up is to start from the keywords and topics.

The idea is to find all the topics your target persona could potentially search for.

Estimate where you could rank for this topic if you would write content.

And then predict the traffic based on the ranking.

“The issue with that is that we don’t know the position or the click-through rate by position”, says Ethan Smith.

What he means is that we don’t know the position our article will rank on Google before actually writing and publishing it.

And even if we knew the position exactly (not possible), we would still need to estimate the traffic we get depending on the page position.

This is called click-through rate (CTR).

In other words, when a keyword gets 100 monthly searches and we rank in position 1, how many clicks do we get?

How does it change when we only rank in position 2?

Nobody knows.

We can only estimate this.

But the problem is that using this approach accumulates a lot of estimates.

For each topics we need to estimate the position and the traffic.

This results in very high uncertainty, a big error bandwidth & thus wrong revenue predictions.

Obviously this is bad.

So is there a better option?

Yes there is: Introducing the top down approach.

The top down approach is competitor centric.

We estimate our traffic potential by looking at the organic traffic competitors get.

So, the traffic they get organically through Google.

But do you remember something?

There are two different types of organic traffic: branded and non branded!

We only care about the non branded traffic.

Why?

The branded traffic is people directly looking for your competitors brand.

This is traffic we can’t get.

SEO generally won’t make people magically search for your brand instead of theirs.

So it does not make sense to include competitors branded search volume when trying to estimate the traffic potential for our site.

Great, so we will first gather the non branded search volume of all competitors, and then?

Then we'll fuse them into a traffic and revenue estimate.

Pretty nice!

So let’s get into it, shall we?

There are two popular ways of forecasting the traffic potential.

Either you go bottom or top down.

Bottom up is to start from the keywords and topics.

The idea is to find all the topics your target persona could potentially search for.

Estimate where you could rank for this topic if you would write content.

And then predict the traffic based on the ranking.

“The issue with that is that we don’t know the position or the click-through rate by position”, says Ethan Smith.

What he means is that we don’t know the position our article will rank on Google before actually writing and publishing it.

And even if we knew the position exactly (not possible), we would still need to estimate the traffic we get depending on the page position.

This is called click-through rate (CTR).

In other words, when a keyword gets 100 monthly searches and we rank in position 1, how many clicks do we get?

How does it change when we only rank in position 2?

Nobody knows.

We can only estimate this.

But the problem is that using this approach accumulates a lot of estimates.

For each topics we need to estimate the position and the traffic.

This results in very high uncertainty, a big error bandwidth & thus wrong revenue predictions.

Obviously this is bad.

So is there a better option?

Yes there is: Introducing the top down approach.

The top down approach is competitor centric.

We estimate our traffic potential by looking at the organic traffic competitors get.

So, the traffic they get organically through Google.

But do you remember something?

There are two different types of organic traffic: branded and non branded!

We only care about the non branded traffic.

Why?

The branded traffic is people directly looking for your competitors brand.

This is traffic we can’t get.

SEO generally won’t make people magically search for your brand instead of theirs.

So it does not make sense to include competitors branded search volume when trying to estimate the traffic potential for our site.

Great, so we will first gather the non branded search volume of all competitors, and then?

Then we'll fuse them into a traffic and revenue estimate.

Pretty nice!

So let’s get into it, shall we?

Step 1 - Gather a direct competitor list

Direct competitors are companies that sell the same product/service as you do.

That's why they are also referred to as product competitors.

For Flappie, there are two: kittyflap.com and yourpawly.com.

So we need to get data for Flappie and their competitors.

Data for Flappie is easy - just use Google Search Console.

But how do we get data for the competitors?

Let me show you. 👇

We’re going to use a mixture of different sources.

All of them can be used for free but you’ll have to create accounts.

Could be worst I think, right?

Also keep in mind that all of the datapoints are estimates.

There is no ground truth here.

The only ground truth you have is for your own page.

But with that being said, let’s get to it!

Total traffic

For an estimate of the total organic traffic we can use Similarweb.

You can set up a free account to access the information.

Add the specific url and then checking the visits over time.

Total organic traffic

We need to find the share of traffic that comes from organic search.

Good that Similarweb provides us with that as well.

You can find the organic search share in the channels overview plot.

Total organic non branded traffic

Now that we have organic traffic, we need to find the share that comes from non branded search.

So searches on Google that don’t contain the brand name.

Different ways to get this.

Again, one option is Similarweb.

The other option is Semrush.

I am always using Semrush over Similarweb as I feel like it is more accurate with regard to branded search data.

With Semrush you can set up an account and get 10 searches per day for free.

10 searches per day.

Use them well!

Here is what you have to do to not waste your daily quota.

First, go to the domain overview tab and put the url into the search bar.

Then scroll down to the branded search section.

Note down the non branded search percentage.


The final non branded organic traffic estimate is calculated as follows:

[organic non branded traffic] = [total traffic] * [organic traffic share] * [non branded share]


Finally, we also want to get the Domain Authority score as this is needed later.

Use Ahrefs for that.

If you don’t have an account, set up their free Ahrefs webmaster tool.

Note down the Domain Authority for your own page and your competitors.

Here is the resulting table I got for Flappie when we started in November 2023.

Note that there are also cat flaps with prey detection being sold on Amazon.

But there is no reason to compare your traffic with Amazon or any other big corporation.

So leave big corporations out of your competitor set.

Great but there are more competitors when it comes to SEO.

I'm talking about indirect competitors!

Let’s see what they are and how to find them.

Direct competitors are companies that sell the same product/service as you do.

That's why they are also referred to as product competitors.

For Flappie, there are two: kittyflap.com and yourpawly.com.

So we need to get data for Flappie and their competitors.

Data for Flappie is easy - just use Google Search Console.

But how do we get data for the competitors?

Let me show you. 👇

We’re going to use a mixture of different sources.

All of them can be used for free but you’ll have to create accounts.

Could be worst I think, right?

Also keep in mind that all of the datapoints are estimates.

There is no ground truth here.

The only ground truth you have is for your own page.

But with that being said, let’s get to it!

Total traffic

For an estimate of the total organic traffic we can use Similarweb.

You can set up a free account to access the information.

Add the specific url and then checking the visits over time.

Total organic traffic

We need to find the share of traffic that comes from organic search.

Good that Similarweb provides us with that as well.

You can find the organic search share in the channels overview plot.

Total organic non branded traffic

Now that we have organic traffic, we need to find the share that comes from non branded search.

So searches on Google that don’t contain the brand name.

Different ways to get this.

Again, one option is Similarweb.

The other option is Semrush.

I am always using Semrush over Similarweb as I feel like it is more accurate with regard to branded search data.

With Semrush you can set up an account and get 10 searches per day for free.

10 searches per day.

Use them well!

Here is what you have to do to not waste your daily quota.

First, go to the domain overview tab and put the url into the search bar.

Then scroll down to the branded search section.

Note down the non branded search percentage.


The final non branded organic traffic estimate is calculated as follows:

[organic non branded traffic] = [total traffic] * [organic traffic share] * [non branded share]


Finally, we also want to get the Domain Authority score as this is needed later.

Use Ahrefs for that.

If you don’t have an account, set up their free Ahrefs webmaster tool.

Note down the Domain Authority for your own page and your competitors.

Here is the resulting table I got for Flappie when we started in November 2023.

Note that there are also cat flaps with prey detection being sold on Amazon.

But there is no reason to compare your traffic with Amazon or any other big corporation.

So leave big corporations out of your competitor set.

Great but there are more competitors when it comes to SEO.

I'm talking about indirect competitors!

Let’s see what they are and how to find them.

Direct competitors are companies that sell the same product/service as you do.

That's why they are also referred to as product competitors.

For Flappie, there are two: kittyflap.com and yourpawly.com.

So we need to get data for Flappie and their competitors.

Data for Flappie is easy - just use Google Search Console.

But how do we get data for the competitors?

Let me show you. 👇

We’re going to use a mixture of different sources.

All of them can be used for free but you’ll have to create accounts.

Could be worst I think, right?

Also keep in mind that all of the datapoints are estimates.

There is no ground truth here.

The only ground truth you have is for your own page.

But with that being said, let’s get to it!

Total traffic

For an estimate of the total organic traffic we can use Similarweb.

You can set up a free account to access the information.

Add the specific url and then checking the visits over time.

Total organic traffic

We need to find the share of traffic that comes from organic search.

Good that Similarweb provides us with that as well.

You can find the organic search share in the channels overview plot.

Total organic non branded traffic

Now that we have organic traffic, we need to find the share that comes from non branded search.

So searches on Google that don’t contain the brand name.

Different ways to get this.

Again, one option is Similarweb.

The other option is Semrush.

I am always using Semrush over Similarweb as I feel like it is more accurate with regard to branded search data.

With Semrush you can set up an account and get 10 searches per day for free.

10 searches per day.

Use them well!

Here is what you have to do to not waste your daily quota.

First, go to the domain overview tab and put the url into the search bar.

Then scroll down to the branded search section.

Note down the non branded search percentage.


The final non branded organic traffic estimate is calculated as follows:

[organic non branded traffic] = [total traffic] * [organic traffic share] * [non branded share]


Finally, we also want to get the Domain Authority score as this is needed later.

Use Ahrefs for that.

If you don’t have an account, set up their free Ahrefs webmaster tool.

Note down the Domain Authority for your own page and your competitors.

Here is the resulting table I got for Flappie when we started in November 2023.

Note that there are also cat flaps with prey detection being sold on Amazon.

But there is no reason to compare your traffic with Amazon or any other big corporation.

So leave big corporations out of your competitor set.

Great but there are more competitors when it comes to SEO.

I'm talking about indirect competitors!

Let’s see what they are and how to find them.

Step 2 - Gather an indirect competitor list

Indirect competitors are those that aren’t offering the same product or service but target a the same or an overlapping audience.

That's why they are also called audience competitors.

So for Flappie, this are cat blogs and companies selling general cat flaps, cat food.

Great, but how can we find them?

One approach is to search for specific keywords your target customers might be searching for.

Then check the top ranking pages across these searches and find domains that often rank.

These are your audience competitors.

Let's go through it using Flappie as an example.

Their target persona is cat owners.

As Flappie targets the German speaking market with content, we use German keywords.

Possible searches are

  • cat flaps (Katzenklappe)

  • cat bites (Katze beißt)

  • can cats eat xyz (Können Katzen xyz essen)

If you need inspiration use Google Keyword Planner to find a few ideas.

The frequently appearing domains in Germany are.

  • petsdeli.de

  • uelzener.de

  • purina.de

  • catsan.de

  • fressnapf.de

  • santevet.de

Another great way to find organic competitors is Ahrefs.

On the Ahrefs domain overview page for Flappie we have this diagram.

Click on the view top 20 button to see more.

The following list opens with organic competitors.

Go through them one by one and understand what they are doing.

If they do completely different things or have very small traffic, ignore them.

Otherwise add them to the list.

I added the following to my list for Flappie.

  • sheba.de

  • catinaflat.ch

  • der-zooexperte.de

  • futterinshaus.de

  • katzenschlau.de

Now go through each one again and decide if the target audience is actually overlapping with yours.

Often, it is way broader.

For example, a lot of the pages like der-zooexperte.de target pet owners in general, not just cat owners.

Thus, they have large organic traffic shares from topics about dogs and other animals.

Flappie isn’t interested in that.

Therefore these pages shouldn’t be used as reference for Flappies organic traffic potential.

Go through the list and remove the pages where the target audience is way to broad.

If you are not sure, just keep them for now.

Again, big corporations shouldn’t be in here either.

For Flappie, I am left with the following sites.

  • sheba.de

  • catinaflat.ch

  • katzenschlau.de

  • catsan.de

Now again find non branded traffic and Domain Authority as described in the previous section.

Indirect competitors are those that aren’t offering the same product or service but target a the same or an overlapping audience.

That's why they are also called audience competitors.

So for Flappie, this are cat blogs and companies selling general cat flaps, cat food.

Great, but how can we find them?

One approach is to search for specific keywords your target customers might be searching for.

Then check the top ranking pages across these searches and find domains that often rank.

These are your audience competitors.

Let's go through it using Flappie as an example.

Their target persona is cat owners.

As Flappie targets the German speaking market with content, we use German keywords.

Possible searches are

  • cat flaps (Katzenklappe)

  • cat bites (Katze beißt)

  • can cats eat xyz (Können Katzen xyz essen)

If you need inspiration use Google Keyword Planner to find a few ideas.

The frequently appearing domains in Germany are.

  • petsdeli.de

  • uelzener.de

  • purina.de

  • catsan.de

  • fressnapf.de

  • santevet.de

Another great way to find organic competitors is Ahrefs.

On the Ahrefs domain overview page for Flappie we have this diagram.

Click on the view top 20 button to see more.

The following list opens with organic competitors.

Go through them one by one and understand what they are doing.

If they do completely different things or have very small traffic, ignore them.

Otherwise add them to the list.

I added the following to my list for Flappie.

  • sheba.de

  • catinaflat.ch

  • der-zooexperte.de

  • futterinshaus.de

  • katzenschlau.de

Now go through each one again and decide if the target audience is actually overlapping with yours.

Often, it is way broader.

For example, a lot of the pages like der-zooexperte.de target pet owners in general, not just cat owners.

Thus, they have large organic traffic shares from topics about dogs and other animals.

Flappie isn’t interested in that.

Therefore these pages shouldn’t be used as reference for Flappies organic traffic potential.

Go through the list and remove the pages where the target audience is way to broad.

If you are not sure, just keep them for now.

Again, big corporations shouldn’t be in here either.

For Flappie, I am left with the following sites.

  • sheba.de

  • catinaflat.ch

  • katzenschlau.de

  • catsan.de

Now again find non branded traffic and Domain Authority as described in the previous section.

Indirect competitors are those that aren’t offering the same product or service but target a the same or an overlapping audience.

That's why they are also called audience competitors.

So for Flappie, this are cat blogs and companies selling general cat flaps, cat food.

Great, but how can we find them?

One approach is to search for specific keywords your target customers might be searching for.

Then check the top ranking pages across these searches and find domains that often rank.

These are your audience competitors.

Let's go through it using Flappie as an example.

Their target persona is cat owners.

As Flappie targets the German speaking market with content, we use German keywords.

Possible searches are

  • cat flaps (Katzenklappe)

  • cat bites (Katze beißt)

  • can cats eat xyz (Können Katzen xyz essen)

If you need inspiration use Google Keyword Planner to find a few ideas.

The frequently appearing domains in Germany are.

  • petsdeli.de

  • uelzener.de

  • purina.de

  • catsan.de

  • fressnapf.de

  • santevet.de

Another great way to find organic competitors is Ahrefs.

On the Ahrefs domain overview page for Flappie we have this diagram.

Click on the view top 20 button to see more.

The following list opens with organic competitors.

Go through them one by one and understand what they are doing.

If they do completely different things or have very small traffic, ignore them.

Otherwise add them to the list.

I added the following to my list for Flappie.

  • sheba.de

  • catinaflat.ch

  • der-zooexperte.de

  • futterinshaus.de

  • katzenschlau.de

Now go through each one again and decide if the target audience is actually overlapping with yours.

Often, it is way broader.

For example, a lot of the pages like der-zooexperte.de target pet owners in general, not just cat owners.

Thus, they have large organic traffic shares from topics about dogs and other animals.

Flappie isn’t interested in that.

Therefore these pages shouldn’t be used as reference for Flappies organic traffic potential.

Go through the list and remove the pages where the target audience is way to broad.

If you are not sure, just keep them for now.

Again, big corporations shouldn’t be in here either.

For Flappie, I am left with the following sites.

  • sheba.de

  • catinaflat.ch

  • katzenschlau.de

  • catsan.de

Now again find non branded traffic and Domain Authority as described in the previous section.

Finetune competitors

Great, we now have one table with direct and audience competitors.

Remove competitors with lower non-branded organic traffic than yours.

This removes yourpawly.com.

Domain Authority scores

We should only choose pages within a domain authority score range from us.

Why?

Because we want to get a realistic estimates.

Comparing ourselves with pages that have way higher domain authority doesn’t make sense.

In Ethan Smiths Reforge course, he suggests to consider competitors within a range of plus/minus 10-15 Domain Authority.

In my example, this would remove sheba.de.

But as Flappie is going to CES, it is fair to assume they will drastically increase their Domain Authority and I will thus keep sheba.de.

We are then left with the following competitors.

As our final monthly traffic estimate, we take the median over the non branded traffic values.

The median allows us to ignore outliers.

For Flappie, we get a monthly non branded traffic estimate of ~6k.

Yearly this is ~72k.

Note that this is only for German speaking countries.

Great, we now have one table with direct and audience competitors.

Remove competitors with lower non-branded organic traffic than yours.

This removes yourpawly.com.

Domain Authority scores

We should only choose pages within a domain authority score range from us.

Why?

Because we want to get a realistic estimates.

Comparing ourselves with pages that have way higher domain authority doesn’t make sense.

In Ethan Smiths Reforge course, he suggests to consider competitors within a range of plus/minus 10-15 Domain Authority.

In my example, this would remove sheba.de.

But as Flappie is going to CES, it is fair to assume they will drastically increase their Domain Authority and I will thus keep sheba.de.

We are then left with the following competitors.

As our final monthly traffic estimate, we take the median over the non branded traffic values.

The median allows us to ignore outliers.

For Flappie, we get a monthly non branded traffic estimate of ~6k.

Yearly this is ~72k.

Note that this is only for German speaking countries.

Great, we now have one table with direct and audience competitors.

Remove competitors with lower non-branded organic traffic than yours.

This removes yourpawly.com.

Domain Authority scores

We should only choose pages within a domain authority score range from us.

Why?

Because we want to get a realistic estimates.

Comparing ourselves with pages that have way higher domain authority doesn’t make sense.

In Ethan Smiths Reforge course, he suggests to consider competitors within a range of plus/minus 10-15 Domain Authority.

In my example, this would remove sheba.de.

But as Flappie is going to CES, it is fair to assume they will drastically increase their Domain Authority and I will thus keep sheba.de.

We are then left with the following competitors.

As our final monthly traffic estimate, we take the median over the non branded traffic values.

The median allows us to ignore outliers.

For Flappie, we get a monthly non branded traffic estimate of ~6k.

Yearly this is ~72k.

Note that this is only for German speaking countries.

Step 3 - From traffic to revenue

As a last step, let’s convert the traffic to revenue potential.

Exciting.

To do that, multiply the traffic by the conversion rate and the customer lifetime value (LTV).

As a lot of the traffic will be highly informational, it makes sense to divide your normal conversion rate by a factor of two.

Let’s assume the conversion rate for Flappie would be 3% and the LTV is $300.

Then, the yearly revenue potential would be 72000 * 0.5 * 0.03 * $300 = $324k.

Again, the 1/2 is due to the conversion rate adjustment as mentioned above.

Not too bad! 🥳

But the question is how long will it take to reach this level?

I think this is a perfect time to talk about the SEO journey.

As a last step, let’s convert the traffic to revenue potential.

Exciting.

To do that, multiply the traffic by the conversion rate and the customer lifetime value (LTV).

As a lot of the traffic will be highly informational, it makes sense to divide your normal conversion rate by a factor of two.

Let’s assume the conversion rate for Flappie would be 3% and the LTV is $300.

Then, the yearly revenue potential would be 72000 * 0.5 * 0.03 * $300 = $324k.

Again, the 1/2 is due to the conversion rate adjustment as mentioned above.

Not too bad! 🥳

But the question is how long will it take to reach this level?

I think this is a perfect time to talk about the SEO journey.

As a last step, let’s convert the traffic to revenue potential.

Exciting.

To do that, multiply the traffic by the conversion rate and the customer lifetime value (LTV).

As a lot of the traffic will be highly informational, it makes sense to divide your normal conversion rate by a factor of two.

Let’s assume the conversion rate for Flappie would be 3% and the LTV is $300.

Then, the yearly revenue potential would be 72000 * 0.5 * 0.03 * $300 = $324k.

Again, the 1/2 is due to the conversion rate adjustment as mentioned above.

Not too bad! 🥳

But the question is how long will it take to reach this level?

I think this is a perfect time to talk about the SEO journey.

SEO Journey

Typically we are talking about a time horizon of 3 years until the traffic estimate is reached.

That’s quite some time.

But you do see results before that.

Typically it takes a quarter to get up to speed with content creation and the growth is then followed by a linear increase in traffic.

Check out the slide below from Ethan smiths talk for an example visualisation of the SEO ROI journey.

So don’t panic too early!

Give it time!

I hope you liked this and now know the SEO potential your site has.

In the next chapter we'll discuss the SEO strategy.

One of my favourite chapters!

Stay on it!

Typically we are talking about a time horizon of 3 years until the traffic estimate is reached.

That’s quite some time.

But you do see results before that.

Typically it takes a quarter to get up to speed with content creation and the growth is then followed by a linear increase in traffic.

Check out the slide below from Ethan smiths talk for an example visualisation of the SEO ROI journey.

So don’t panic too early!

Give it time!

I hope you liked this and now know the SEO potential your site has.

In the next chapter we'll discuss the SEO strategy.

One of my favourite chapters!

Stay on it!

Typically we are talking about a time horizon of 3 years until the traffic estimate is reached.

That’s quite some time.

But you do see results before that.

Typically it takes a quarter to get up to speed with content creation and the growth is then followed by a linear increase in traffic.

Check out the slide below from Ethan smiths talk for an example visualisation of the SEO ROI journey.

So don’t panic too early!

Give it time!

I hope you liked this and now know the SEO potential your site has.

In the next chapter we'll discuss the SEO strategy.

One of my favourite chapters!

Stay on it!

Good Read?

Learned something?

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The SEO Operating System for Startups Founders

Copyright © 2024 Profaile GmbH. All rights reserved.

The SEO Operating System for Startups Founders

Copyright © 2024 Profaile GmbH. All rights reserved.